Snippet from the Leytonstone Arts Trail July 2018

There were many excellent arts events during July in Leytonstone and sadly I was not able to visit them all. However, I would like to share my reflections on one entitled ‘Identity’ held above the Birds pub in Leytonstone High Road. Three artists Ellie Cox, Olmo Ramella and Paolo Ramella contributed works around this theme.

Viewing this exhibition brought to mind the framework or lense through which we visualise and make sense of the world. Very interesting ideas emanate from this concept. Here are some of the pieces that caught my eye.

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To find out more about the exhibition and the artists see http://www.leytonstoneartstrail.org/identity

For more on the other exhibitions in Leytonstone in July see http://www.leytonstoneartstrail.org/category/exhibitions/

Blue Plaques of Leytonstone

Fanny Craddock

Fanny Craddock

The first TV chef I remember was the terrifying Fanny Craddock. You have to be of a certain age to know her name as she pioneered the idea that we can eat more interesting food following the period of rationing of the 1940s and early 50s. She was born in Fairlop Road Leytonstone and while there is a blue plaque to commemorate her the original house was demolished years ago.

 

Probably the most known resident of Leytonstone is film director Sir Alfred Hitchcock.

Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s parents had a greengrocers shop in Leytonstone high road in what is now a petrol station. Hitchcock was part of a group of young film makers from London who made films in what was a thriving London film industry.

 

 

Blur lead singer and musician Damon Albarn grew up in Fillebrook Road Leytonstone and attended George Tomlinson Primary School. Albarn references local landmarks such as Hollow

Damon Albarn

Damon Albarn

Ponds in his music.

 

 

 

 

 

Photographer David Bailey was born in Leytonstone and lived in Wallwood Road E11. He was part of the exciting new group of talented people from more humble backgrounds who were able to break through to prominence in the progressive atmosphere of the 1960s. His photography was more naturalistic and less formal than previous fashion photography.  He was perhaps the first superstar of photography and very much a part of the ‘swinging sixties’.

David Bailey

David Bailey

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you know of any other WFH blue plaques in Leytonstone please let me know via the comment section below. For a fuller list of Leytonstone notables see here.

By Martin Sepion